Spacewalkers

October 16, 2017

Festival, Review, This Week Leave a Comment

Spacewalkers John Noonan Year: 2017 Rating: NA Director: Dmitry Kiselyov Cast: Evgeniy Mironov, Konstantin Khabenskiy, Vladimir Olyin, Anatoly Kotenyev, Alexandra Ursulyak Festival 2017 Russian Resurrection Film Festival Released: October 26 – November 19, 2017 Running Time: 140 minutes Worth: $16.00 FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to ...
spacewalker

Spacewalkers

John Noonan
Year: 2017
Rating: NA
Director: Dmitry Kiselyov
Cast:

Evgeniy Mironov, Konstantin Khabenskiy, Vladimir Olyin, Anatoly Kotenyev, Alexandra Ursulyak

Released: October 26 – November 19, 2017
Running Time: 140 minutes
Worth: $16.00

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

Engrossing, nerve rattling and patriotic without turning into parody…

Films such as The Right Stuff and Apollo 13 are considered classics in their genre; true tales of steely US determination to conquer the stars. Conversely, Russia, the US’s only real competitor in the great space race, is painted as a footnote in America’s climb to the top. Spacewalker attempts to re-address the balance with the true story of cosmonauts, Pavel Belyayev (Konstantin Khabenskiy) and Alexey Leonov (Evgeniv Mironov).

It’s the ‘60s and the US and Russia are competing to be the first to have a man walk in outer space. Getting wind of the progress their rivals are making, the Kremlin pull their deadlines forward by two years in the hope of being the first out of the gate. Directed by Dmitry Kiselyov (Black Lightning), Spacewalker starts with a tame first act that follows Belyayev and Leonov through their training. Slowly, we begin to see cracks in the veneer. Yes, a technician dies whilst helping to build the very craft that will be shot off into space. But hey, it’s nothing that isn’t to be expected and can’t be quickly dusted under the carpet all in pursuit of glory.

Once the cosmonauts are blasted off into the unknown, the aforementioned death retroactively becomes a portance of things to come. The rush to be first leads to problems and very quickly, Spacewalker breaks free from the biopic tropes that weigh it down to become a throughly engaging and tense thriller. Backed by a score that would make Hans Zimmer blush, Kiselyov racks up a surprisingly large amount of tension from a setting which is essentially two men in a metal box, whilst on Earth their fates are decided by bureaucratic yes-men more concerned about the reputation of the motherland.

Engrossing, nerve rattling and patriotic without turning into parody, Spacewalker is a fascinating glimpse into another time and place.

 

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