The End of the F***ing World

January 8, 2018

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...an enjoyable enough slice of sardonic misanthropy.
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The End of the F***ing World

Travis Johnson
Year: 2018
Rating: NA
Director: Jonathan Entwhistle and Lucy Tcherniak
Cast:

Alex Lawther, Jessica Barden

Distributor: Netflix
Format:
Released: January 5, 2018
Running Time: 20 minutes x 8 episodes
Worth: $13.50

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

…an enjoyable enough slice of sardonic misanthropy.

Alienated teenager James (Alex Lawther) thinks he might be a psychopath. He enjoys killing animals and once stuck his hand in a deep fryer just to feel something. Alienated teenager Alyssa (Jessica Barden) thinks she might be in love with James. She knows she hates her rich family and wants to reconnect with her absent birth father. She convinces James to steal his father’s car and come with her on a road trip to find errant dad. She thinks it’s romantic. He thinks she might be his first human victim. Kids, hey?

Adapted from the graphic novel by Charles S. Forsman, The End of the F***ing World takes the lovers-on-the-run model beloved of American cinema since the year dot and filters through an understated, wry, British sensibility. It is quite violent – two minutes in we have James dispatching a cat with a knife – but also thoughtful and self-deprecating, setting up our two protagonists as initially unlikable and self-deluded, but gradually evincing empathy as their tragic back stories are revealed over the course of the series, and they come to realise that their morbid self-obsession and instinctive acts of rebellion have real world consequences.

Still, why is it a series? The show is surprisingly slow paced, and it’s not hard to imagine a version of the series edited down to feature length that would retain its mood, themes, and black comedy. It feels like its current form is a concession to the binge-watch streaming model, but there’s not really enough story to justify it. Still, it’s an enjoyable enough slice of sardonic misanthropy.

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