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Mafia: Definitive Edition

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2002 was a long time ago, both literally and figuratively. In 2002, we were one year on from September 11 and feeling very unsure about the world in which we lived. Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring was tearing it up at the box office and Black Hawk Down was proving war movies could still bring it. People with good taste were listening to Queens of the Stone Age’s third studio album, Songs for the Deaf, and a bunch of deadset monsters continued to line Coldplay’s pockets by inexplicably hurling handfuls of dosh at A Rush of Blood to the Head. Oh, also, a little game by the name of Mafia came out to considerable critical acclaim.

Mafia was, at the time, a rather unique proposition. A story-focused game, told in a very cinematic fashion, that occupied a pseudo open world. Unlike the other big crime game released that year, Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, Mafia played it straight, with genuine attempts at pathos and historical accuracy. The story revolved around Thomas “Tommy” Angelo who, through a chance encounter, goes from a simple life driving a cab to joining the Salieri family, one of the biggest crime organisations in the fictional city of Lost Heaven.



The year is now 2020, eighteen long years from that innocent era, and Mafia has been remastered and tweaked into the slick, gorgeous-looking form of Mafia: Definitive Edition. Graphics and animation have been brought up to modern standards, and even the script has been given a punch up, with expanded and improved dialogue throughout the entire ten or so hour experience. So, is it worth the revisit? Kinda. See, while the presentation is superb, even a polished version of the script feels dated and a bit flat. It’s your usual ‘guy is seduced by the mob, realises it’s not all that it’s cracked up to be and tries to escape’ narrative you’ve seen a thousand times before. Hell, it was a bit creaky back in 2002, but in 2020? It’s practically an antique.

The gameplay also is very… adequate. Stiff driving, which is appropriate for the ancient cars you’ll be driving but not exactly a joyful time, combined with mediocre shooting mechanics make for an experience that relies heavily on your love of the original title. Are you super invested in revisiting the old favourite and willing to overlook its many archaic elements? You might have a good time. But for anyone pining for story and gameplay that feel fresh and unique, Mafia: Definitive Edition is probably not the family you’ll want to join.

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The Outer Worlds: Peril on Gordon

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The Outer Worlds was released just under a year ago, in that ancient halcyon age of 2019. Critical consensus (including our own) was that while the game was imperfect, it captured much of the black humour, RPG mechanics and interesting, nuanced story that wasn’t on display in the latest iterations of Fallout or Mass Effect. Yes, some of the action was a bit repetitive, and the enemy variety a tad lacking, but there was a lot to like about the title. Peril on Gorgon represents the first major DLC drop for the game and the result, honestly, is a bit of a disappointment.

Peril on Gorgon tells a mostly self-contained story that predominantly takes place on the Gorgon asteroid, and it involves (yet again) a science experiment gone terribly wrong. You’ll need to explore the rather drab asteroid as you piece together what happened and choose what to do with that information, which is fine, in theory, but the final revelation is profoundly underwhelming. In fact, the whole DLC feels like a retelling of the plot of Joss Whedon’s Firefly movie, Serenity. That flick’s a lot of fun, don’t get us wrong, but it does make the narrative lose its mystique once you’ve worked out what’s happening.

Peril on Gorgon makes its first mistake right out of the gate. It’s DLC that exists after the beginning of the game but before the ending, so if you don’t have a save file in that area, it’s tough titty, my friend, you’ll have to start a whole new game. Happily, your humble reviewer had a save in the sweet spot, but it couldn’t help but make the entire DLC feel like cut content from the main game. Perhaps, if this 4-6 hour digression had appeared in the vanilla campaign, it would have felt more at home, however as a DLC it seems slight and half baked. The player level cap is raised to 33, there are a handful of new weapons and armour, but a total lack of new abilities or companions can’t help but hammer home the feeling of half arsedness. And the fact that you’re fighting predominantly the same old enemies, that you got bored of in the main game, is just a bummer.

The Outer Worlds: Peril on Gorgon, fundamentally, is just a very average experience. While it does offer more Outer Worlds, which is welcome in theory, it also provides poor level design, samey encounters and an overall sense of been there, done that. If you haven’t played The Outer Worlds yet (and you absolutely should) it might fatten out the campaign, but otherwise you’d have to be pretty hard-up to peer into the eyes of this gorgon.

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Kingdoms of Amalur: Re-Reckoning

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In 2012, approximately 745 years ago in video game terms, an action RPG called Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning was released on PC, PS3 and XBOX360. Developed by Big Huge Games and 38 Studios, the game was a massive, sprawling, ambitious combination of rich storytelling (by acclaimed fantasy scribe R.A. Salvatore), strong imagery (by Spawn creator Todd McFarlane) and fast-paced, intuitive combat rarely seen in RPGs at the time. It launched to mostly positive reviews and sold in decent numbers. The assumption was, this would be the first chapter in an increasingly epic series, a fresh face on the RPG landscape. Fate, however, weaves a twisted tapestry and not long afterwards, 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy (due to staggering fiscal mismanagement) and Kingdoms of Amalur was destined to forever be known as that endearing one hit wonder. Cut to: 2020, unofficial year of the remaster, and Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning is back as… Kingdoms of Amalur: Re-Reckoning. Oof. And to be honest, the title isn’t the only misstep here.

Kingdoms of Amalur: Re-Reckoning has one of the strongest openings in RPG history. You’re a corpse, manhandled by dwarves onto a groaning pile of your fellow deceased, when suddenly you shuffle the mortal coil back on and begin your adventure. Why and how you’re alive, what the deal is with the invading hordes and your connection to fate itself are all questions you’ll need to explore over the course of this extremely large (60-100 hour) adventure. So, that’s the story. What’s new in this 2020 remaster? Erm, not a great deal, just quietly. The graphics have been given a minor polish, and the animation runs at a mostly solid 60 frames per second, but in terms of meaningful additions or even quality of life changes (like the ability to loot multiple corpses at once), there’s sweet Fanny Adams on offer.

So, while the combat is still fast-paced and flowing, and the story remains intriguing particularly in the main quests, Kingdoms can’t help but feel very dated indeed. Multiple fetch quests, large empty-feeling environments and exposition delivered via text dumps all chip away at your enjoyment. At nearly a decade old, Kingdoms feels particularly molested by the passage of time. On the plus side, for console owners this represents the only way to get the game and it looks as good as it has ever been. For hardcore fans of the original this may well be enough, and don’t get us wrong – there’s a lot of game here and if you’re able to overlook its shortcomings, much adventure awaits. For those of us hoping the game might get a remaster experience comparable to the likes of BioShock: The Collection or Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2, sadly this has proven to be an epic fantasy.



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Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2

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It’s hard to explain to the younger generations just how much the Tony Hawk games dominated loungerooms in the late ’90s/early 2000s. Afternoons, evenings, post-club kick ons and even cheeky sick days were spent mastering the bird man’s trickier moves, usually shrouded in a haze of bong smoke and concentration sweat. That sense of baked camaraderie, combined with the “just one more go” addiction spiral, made these games indelible parts of the video game landscape. Of course, the party couldn’t go on forever, and while it’s debatable which Hawk game finally sunk the franchise, things had well and truly died in the arse by the time the execrable Pro Skater 5 plopped out in 2015. It seemed that those halcyon days were well and truly over and then Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2 dropped in and it’s like the ’90s have returned, except this time we’re old.

Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2 is much more than your typical remaster. It is, in fact, a ground up remake of the first two Pro Skater titles with gorgeous graphics, slick animation, familiar but tweaked gameplay and the original game’s steep learning curve very much present. In fact, due to the animation being so slick, and the frame rate so high, the game’s actually significantly faster than you might remember, which may well give your entropy-dulled reflexes a work out. All the great locations from the first two games are present, with some reimagined and tweaked elements (The Mall now looks like a post apocalyptic, deserted hellscape) and the tricks from later games – manuals, reverts, wall plants etc. – have been added. There’s also a robust Create-A-Skater mode, the character then able to be used across both games and online, and the Create-A-Park mode, which is a hoot for the very patient.

About the only misstep in this entire game involves its multiplayer modes. See, while you can link up with a mate and run through online challenges (like trick attack) with a bunch of randoms, you can’t just bum around a location that’s exclusive to the pair of you. No private matches, no co-op play through freshly unlocked levels and not even any bloody HORSE! It’s probably a tad churlish to complain about a feature missing that sure as hell wasn’t in the original, but in 2020 to not have that level of online interactivity seems a disappointing omission and something that would be wise to correct in this or future entries.

Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2 probably won’t blow away newbies, and honestly, Skate was a better pure skating game (remaster or sequel, please, EA) but if you loved these games back in the day there’s a better-than-average chance you’ll love them anew here. Disappointing online selection aside, this is a near-perfect remaster and a delicious slice of rose-tinted nostalgia done right.

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Wasteland 3

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It’s while I’m attacking the Gippers that I’m reminded of that Mitchell and Webb sketch about the self-aware Nazis. You know, the one where they ask, “are we the baddies?”, after realising that they’re very much on the wrong side of history. The reason it springs to mind, as I cover the floor with zealot blood and guts, is because what started out with the best of intentions has become a massacre. And while the Gippers are as mad as a sackful of rats – worshipping the memory of pre-apocalypse president Ronald Reagan and calling everyone “commies” – I’m not sure that they deserve this fate. When I exit the front doors of the Western White House, now spattered red, the Godfishers are waiting for me. I made a deal with them, you see. Told the lunatics I’d let them kill the Gippers in exchange for access to their territory, a promise I have very clearly broken. So, as my six strong squad of rangers readies itself for another battle, I can’t help but wonder: are we the baddies?

Welcome to Wasteland 3, the long-awaited post-apocalyptic RPG from inXile Entertainment, that puts the emphasis on tough choices, decisions that have genuine consequences and moral ambiguity that will haunt your non-playing hours.

Wasteland 3 puts you in the boots of two rangers, pre-made or user generated, the only survivors of an ill-advised journey to the frozen hell of Colorado. Once you’ve checked in with local leader The Patriarch, you’ll need to add to your team, take on missions, upgrade your HQ and – most importantly – decide where you stand, morally-speaking. Will you side with the Patriarch’s authoritarian rule or do you think that there are worthier leaders waiting in the wings? Will you bring peace and prosperity to Colorado or would you just rather shoot and loot your way through the various communities. Do you want a better world, or would you prefer to just watch it burn? All of these disparate concepts are viable options and the range of choices you can make is genuinely dizzying. Most RPGs, even the very good ones, deliver nothing more than the illusion of choice, but Wasteland 3 raises the bar, making the game one of the best pure RPG experiences currently available.

Played from an isometric point of view, Wasteland 3 certainly isn’t the prettiest game around. The backgrounds are often drab, the character models a little stiff and while the many turn-based battles that you’ll take part in look perfectly fine, this won’t be a game that knocks your socks off in terms of presentation. The voice acting, however, is very decent, with most of the dialogue voiced and the writing is stellar, with none of the bloat you usually find in this type of game. Performance-wise, it has to be said, the game does have a few bugs at launch. Animation glitches, some audio dropouts and even a few hard crashes to desktop (playing on a PS4 Pro), however, they’re likely to be patched soon. Pleasingly, load times are quite tolerable, particularly compared to the likes of Pillars of Eternity and Divinity: Original Sin 2.

Ultimately, however, Wasteland 3 is all about the choices you make and the paths you take. Before you know it, you’ll be part of a civil war, unearthing conspiracies or, you know, accidentally wiping out two entire communities of religious fanatics because you prioritised mission success over human lives. Despite the game’s often lunatic sense of humour (with toey robot prostitutes and suicide bomber pigs), these decisions will weigh on you, have you thinking about them and probably inform a second or third playthrough. It’s rough around the edges, and needs a little patience at the beginning, but Wasteland 3 is one of the best RPGs in years and an absolute must-play title during these bizarre, dystopian times.

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Pathfinder: Kingmaker Definitive Edition

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Pathfinder: Kingmaker is the latest PC RPG to make the leap to consoles, transplanting keyboard and mouse gameplay into the realm of the casual couch and comfy trackie-daks. This has been going on for a while, with the likes of Pillars of Eternity and Divinity: Original Sin forging the way to much success, particularly in the case of the latter. That’s not to say Pathfinder is more of the same, mind you, because while there are many superficial similarities with others, this epic title from Russian developer Owlcat Games offers unique twists on a now familiar formula.

Pathfinder is set in the Stolen Lands, and casts you in the boots of a character – either self generated or preset – who will need to gather a party, grow in strength, take on increasingly tough missions and eventually defeat a tough boss. Sounds familiar, right? And it is, with a lot of generic high fantasy tropes executed in a solid but unexceptional fashion. However, once you beat the baddie, a particularly nasty wanker called the Stag Lord, you’re handed a barony and new responsibilities that involve managing funds, building the right structures and keeping the populace happy and safe.

They’ve gone and put a bloody town management game in your RPG! You’ll still be required to go on epic quests, mind you, but now you’ll need to manage your increasing lands as well. It’s… kind of a lot, to be honest, and those who’d rather just dungeon crawl without reading the instructions should possibly look elsewhere.

That said, if you’re up for the challenge (and able to watch a few Youtube videos before you even begin), Pathfinder is an absolute game changer. One of the best aspects is the combat. Is it turn-based or real time with pause? It’s both. And unlike Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire, you can switch between the two on the fly. Mid-dungeon fighting weak arse trash mobs of low level spiders or skeletons? Put it on RTWP and let the AI do the work. Come up against a tough boss that requires a little more strategy and finesse? Notch it back to turn-based and conquer.

It’s a brilliant addition to the genre and one that would be great to see embraced by other developers. Add to that a dizzying array of difficulty customisation options – wherein you can change the level of AI, the fail states and even switch the kingdom management to “automatic” if that sort of fiddly nonsense isn’t your bag – and you’ve got a game that feels like it can be honed to your specific style of play.

The graphics are crisp and colourful, the sound and music solid and even the load times, the inexplicable bane of this genre’s console ports, are better than most. On the downside, the story and script never really rise much above the level of perfectly adequate. You’ll have fun, you’ll be engaged but you’re unlikely to be shocked by something creative and unexpected like Divinity: Original Sin 2. Difficulty spikes can be an issue too, although there’s usually a lateral, albeit nerdy, solution to most problems. The Stag Lord, for instance. Rather than face him head on, you can turn half his lieutenants against him, kill those who won’t be convinced and even rope in his pet bear to join the boot party.

Pathfinder: Kingmaker Definitive Edition comes packaged with all the DLCs, offering literally hundreds of hours of gameplay. While it doesn’t deliver the easiest experience for old school style RPG noobs, careful and patient investigation and experimentation will have your party feeling powerful and ripping through dungeons in no time. Once you get your head around the multifarious systems, Pathfinder: Kingmaker reveals itself to be one of the most nuanced and satisfying RPGs of 2020 and a delightful surprise for those with the patience and time to really hook in.

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Skater XL

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There was a time, back in the distant days of gaming, when skateboarding titles were all the rage. Tony Hawk Pro Skater sequels shot into the clammy palms of loungeroom skegs with almost alarming regularity and for those who preferred their kickflips to be a little more nuanced and technical, EA’s Skate trilogy had you covered. And then, for reasons pertaining to the vagaries of the industry, they all just sort of… stopped. If you wanted to pop a sick ollie, you had to do so outside, in the disgusting real world of people and sun. Now, on the eve of a Tony Hawk remaster, a new contender has entered the ring in the form of Skater XL. A game that, while brimming with potential, makes an ironic mockery of its title.

Skater XL puts you in the comfy kicks of a skater, either user-generated or pre-existing, and after a brief tutorial, you’re sent out into the world. It features a fascinating, and extremely nuanced, control system that uses the dual analogue sticks as your left and right feet. It’s fiddly at first, but you’ll soon grow accustomed to the controls and pull off some genuinely stylish tricks, made even more intriguing by the fact that the game uses real physics. In practical terms, this means every move happens organically, based on your controller movements and not cueing a pre-existing animation, which lends a high degree of individuality to your sessions.

All good news so far, yeah? The problem? That’s the entire game. There’s no story mode, no overarching purpose, no multiplayer or even things to unlock. You just sort of noodle around, popping tricks until you get bored or need to take a slash. A handful of maps with rather dull “challenges” (which are basically extended tutorials) and a fiddly video editor so you can record and upload your sessions. Now, for some people this will be enough. Your humble writer has fond (albeit vague) memories of hanging out with stoner flatmates, popping tricks in Skate and making one’s own fun as the controller was passed back and forth. If you’re up for a languid, chill session like that, Skater XL may be the ticket. If you want some kind of feedback, some kind of sense of progression or interaction with the game? You might want to look elsewhere.

Skater XL’s faults are compounded by the fact that it’s currently retailing (on console, at least) for nearly seventy dollarydoos! This is the kind of experience that would feel justified for twenty bucks or so, but being within cooee of full price is absurd. The lack of content, the occasionally janky animation and clipping, combined with a general lack of purpose, leaves Skater XL feeling more like a promising tech demo rather than a full game experience. What’s there is good, sometimes great, but it’s nowhere near enough yet to justify a purchase for any but the most obsessive of skating game fans.

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XCOM: Chimera Squad

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What happens to society after an alien occupation is thwarted by humanity? Are all of the aliens dead? If not, where do they go? Internment camps? Poor neighbourhoods? Can they ever be trusted to join human society and what of their technology? These are the heady, sci-fi questions at the centre of XCOM: Chimera Squad, a standalone XCOM entry that follows on from XCOM 2 and War of the Chosen, and while not perfect, it is a fascinating insight into what we might expect from the inevitable XCOM 3.

Chimera Squad takes place in City 31, a model city where humans and aliens live side by side. Of course, old tensions and resentments simmer beneath the surface and when the Mayor is killed in a terrorist attack it’s up to Chimera Squad – a group comprising alien and human members – to get to the bottom of what’s happening before it’s too late.

The first thing to notice about Chimera Squad is the vastly different tone to XCOM 2. That fantastic game is, it has to be said, a tension filled nightmare that at times seems to delight in flicking a rubber band at your ballbag while cackling like a cartoon witch. The ticking clock, the ramped-up difficulty (even on lower settings) and the permanent deaths of your squad members all make XCOM 2 feel like a 30-hour anxiety attack. Chimera Squad, on the other hand, is much more forgiving, action-focused and has no perma-death. This makes it a much more approachable concern for newbies, although the stakes never feel quite as high and therefore the victories are never as dizzy.

Turn-based tactics remain the gameplay style, but a breaching mechanic, squad members with cool alien powers and easier-to-attain weaponry offer a more streamlined experience. This will likely not delight XCOM purists, but it does mean you get to appreciate the excellent world-building between missions, with genuinely clever ideas showcased in this brave new integrated world.

Ultimately XCOM: Chimera Squad is a bold, engaging experiment that delves into what might happen after the smoke clears from a defeated alien occupation. Some may be a little put off by the brighter tone and streamlined gameplay, but the charms here are many and using the same powers that so definitively kicked your arse in XCOM 2 is a hoot. An imperfect game, to be sure, but one that also offers an engaging and tantalising epilogue and perhaps a preview of things to come in future entries.

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Carrion

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Even the most casual gamer will have spent hours of their in-game lives hunting and destroying monsters. Whether the setting is a pristine laboratory, an abandoned warehouse or sinister factory, it’s likely you’ll have splattered an irate organism or cranky xenomorph across it many times over. But what if you weren’t the heroic human in the story? What if, in fact, you were the slime-slicked creature crawling through the vents? That is the premise of Carrion, a game that really shows how much difference a change of perspective can make.

Carrion puts you in the pulsating biomass of a nameless beastie being experimented on in a laboratory. At the beginning of the game you manage to escape from a canister as a small but swift critter, and then it’s time to evolve, increase in size and power, and find your freedom. Oh, and you’ll massacre and absorb a metric tonne of quivering, screaming, terror-scented human flesh along the way.

Of all the many things Carrion does right, its best element by far is the way the monster feels to play. The rapid, slithering, tentacular movement remains exhilarating from minute one to the conclusion four or five hours later. Sweeping out of vents to grab scientists and rip them in half, punching through obstructions like a tumescent wrecking ball and letting out a roar before you engulf multiple victims like a wave of malignant meat is just… wonderful. If you’re of a slightly demented mindset like your humble reviewer, you’ll likely spend much of the game cackling like a cartoon banshee, much to the chagrin of flatmates and cats.

The graphics too, in a crisp engaging pixel art style, tickle all the right retro gaming receptors and are a joy to behold. Slightly less successful is some of the exploration, with a few of the environments reading too similarly to deliver legible landmarks, which can lead to some frustrating and confusing navigation loops, compounded by the lack of a map. Also, players expecting a strong narrative or enticing backstory will likely be left a little cold, because it’s pretty threadbare.

Still and all, the story is not what Carrion is about. This is the type of clever indie game that saw the incredible third act of Playdead’s Inside and went “yeah, let’s do a whole game of that!” and it’s as giddy and satisfying as that sounds. Certainly, the short length and repetitive gameplay will give some pause, but for those who always felt like The Thing from John Carpenter’s The Thing got a raw deal, Carrion will provide splattery catharsis. And in the end, it turns out ol’ mate Friedrich Nietzsche was right: when fighting monsters you yourself do become a monster… and it’s a fucken hoot!

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Destroy All Humans

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Twas the year 2005 when the first iteration of Destroy all Humans blasted onto Xbox and Playstation 2. Gaming was a more innocent pursuit in those days, and the world felt like a less harsh place, so the notion of playing as an intergalactic baddie disintegrating and anal probing your way through a stylised 1950s humanity felt quite subversive and daring.

Destroy all Humans was a perfect couch game, particularly after a cheeky smoke or a drink, and managed to feel anarchic without a lot of edgelord posturing and grimdark nonsense. It was a fun, silly but engaging romp in which you could topple buildings by hurling cows at them and now, in this wretched year of 2020, Destroy all Humans is back. But was this title worth another spin? Pretty much, but there are some caveats.

The game puts you in control of xenophobic, gravel-voiced intergalactic sociopath Cryptosporidium-137. Crypto’s on Earth looking for his previous clone, Cryptosporidium-136 and is more than happy to get his hands dirty trying to find him. Throughout the campaign you’ll find yourself brainwashing, stealing the identity from and straight up murdering a shitload of feeble humans, both to please your boss Orthopox (voiced by Invader Zim’s Richard Steven Horvitz) and for the lols.

If you can picture a game that combines the cheerful homicide of Mars Attacks! (1996) with the shouty banter of Invader Zim, with just a soupcon of Men in Black (1997) you’ve imagined Destroy all Humans. It’s a goofy riff on Cold War era US propaganda films and camp sci-fi, with a surprisingly hefty suite of skills, powers and upgrade trees.

Gameplay occurs in town hub areas where you can either take on missions or indulge a bunch of challenges like racing, bovine extraction and killing folks in various imaginative ways. The more side pursuits you tackle, the more powerful you can make Crypto, and the resulting carnage is often hilarious, in a goofy stoner sort of way.

Destroy all Humans looks grand, developer Black Forest Games did not pinch pennies when remaking this puppy, and a few instances of pop in and cropping aside, it could easily pass as a modern title. Slightly more dated is the script, sense of humour and gameplay, with often quite simplistic mission loops that felt a lot fresher fifteen years ago. That said, chaining electrical beam weapons against hordes of screaming humans, hurling people into the ocean with telekinesis and watching a disintegrator beam burning homo sapiens down to their wide-eyed skeletons was a hoot in 2005 and remains so now.

The sci-fi parody was always a bit of a B-grade effort, and while the remake certainly brings the aesthetics up to modern standards, the game itself remains mostly the same. Thing is, there’s a lot of fun to be had here, if you can channel that inner stoner, or appreciate the camp delights contained within. It’s noisy, silly, and occasionally a bit dated, but ultimately Destroy all Humans executes a colourful genocide with a twinkle in its eye and if that sounds like your jam, this is one close encounter not to miss.

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