Watch Dogs: Legion

November 2, 2020

Game, Home, Review, This Week 1 Comment

....a memorable, engaging romp through near-future London with oodles of systems to muck about with and trouble to start against the forces of oppression.
legion

Watch Dogs: Legion

Anthony O'Connor
Year: 2020
Rating: R
Director: Clint Hocking, Kent Hudson
Distributor: Ubisoft
Format:
Released: Out Now
Running Time: 30-40 hour campaign, incoming multiplayer
Worth: $14.50

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

….a memorable, engaging romp through near-future London with oodles of systems to muck about with and trouble to start against the forces of oppression.

Tell you what, there must have been some champagne corks a-popping over at Ubisoft HQ when Cyberpunk 2077 was delayed yet again. The latest (and hopefully final) delay has shoved CD Projekt Red’s insanely anticipated title back to December 10, from a much-touted November 19 launch day. That means that November of this hell year of 2020 has just one plucky cyberpunky game on the block, and that game is Watch Dogs: Legion.

The Watch Dogs series has always been an odd duck, brimming with potential that has never entirely been realised, but with Legion – set in the near-future in an Orwellian London – they’ve definitely had a red hot go this time around and created the best title in the series so far.

Watch Dogs: Legion tells the story of the London branch of hacktivist group, DedSec. In the opening minutes of the game, the group is almost completely destroyed and blamed for a savage act of terrorism. Since that day, security group Albion has turned London into a police state and it’s up to the loosely affiliated remains of DedSec to set things right, using their hacking skills, combat abilities and Pommy accents so broad they’d make Dick Van Dyke blush.

Watch Dogs: Legion’s story, while seasoned with a pinch of future dystopia ala Black Mirror, is still very much business as usual. You’ll have enemies to vanquish, computers to hack, civilians to convert and loads of busywork to complete. The gameplay, too, while engaging on a minute by minute basis isn’t exactly revolutionary. No, what sets Legion apart from other Watch Dogs titles is that you can recruit and then control any and every NPC that wanders around in the game’s massive map. Just think about that for a second: Every. Single. NPC. You see someone you like the look of, or scan them and realise that their skills will be useful, you can chat with them, do a short mission for them and then assume control of them, swelling the DedSec ranks with skills that are useful in certain situations, or perhaps you just thought their trousers were nice.

For instance, you recruit a tradie so you never get questioned when walking around a building site. Or perhaps you recruit a tidy fighter, if you need to get all kicky-punchy with some folks. Or a gun nut. Or a lady who can summon a construction drone you can ride like a hoverboard. Or a bloke who has weaponised cyber bees (no kidding, this actually exists). It’s impossible to overstate what a seismic shift this mechanic represents, and the near-endless options it gives you in accomplishing your goals.

Of course, playing as anyone diffuses the already overly familiar story, and it also means that most characters sound the same, which is unfortunately all a bit “oo-er guvna, let’s smash the system and ‘ave some fish and chips, by crikey”. It’s also a little hard to take the frothing anti-capitalist banter seriously when the Ubisoft store has a perpetually tumescent prompt, swollen with its desire to separate the player from their hard earned dosh.

Still and all, wonky dialogue and corporate greed aside, Watch Dogs: Legion took a big risk with its recruitment mechanic and it’s certainly paid off. And while it’s not a perfect game, and one wishes Ubisoft would push the narrative envelope a little harder, it’s a memorable, engaging romp through near-future London with oodles of systems to muck about with and trouble to start against the forces of oppression. So if you want to scratch that cyberpunk itch, and enjoy a memorable game in its own right, Watch Dogs: Legion has you covered. So quicksticks ‘op on this one and take back London, innit!

 

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Comments

  1. Patricia Robson

    I’ve been waiting for Cyberpunk 2077 to come out, but also had Watch Dogs: Legion on pre-order.

    I was only mildly disappointed with the delay as it meant more time to devote to WDL. Having played WD2, I can say that the game has definitely improved. However, there are a few bugs that need to be fixed, which I’m yet to see patched. These are minor and can be easily circumnavigated by selecting different operatives.

    The fact that I can now use a construction worker to summon a construction zone and simply fly (albeit slowly) around a dystopian London is worth the trouble.

    I’m enjoying the shenanigans of a Dedsec operative so much that I’m taking my time going through the main story.

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