We’ll End Up Together [Nous Finirons Ensemble]

August 5, 2020

Review, Theatrical, This Week 4 Comments

Any film with Cluzet, Dujardin, Cotillard, etc, is passable, and even though one could have wished for a bit more grit and substance, this is also easy to watch.
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We’ll End Up Together [Nous Finirons Ensemble]

Julian Wood
Year: 2019
Rating: M
Director: Guillaume Canet
Cast:

Francois Cluzet, Marion Cotillard, Gilles Lellouche, Pascale Arbillot, Jose Garcia, Clementine Baert, Laurent Lafitte

Distributor: Palace Films
Released: August 6, 2020
Running Time: 134 minutes
Worth: $14.00

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

Any film with Cluzet, Dujardin, Cotillard, etc, is passable, and even though one could have wished for a bit more grit and substance, this is also easy to watch.

Now that we are more or less locked down again, maybe we can get our pleasures from something set in a beautiful unobtainable location like a French seaside town (Cap Ferret)? This one is a companion piece/update to a previous film called Little White Lies by director Guillaume Canet (Tell No One). Once again, he has the benefit of a very strong ensemble cast featuring half a dozen faces familiar to French cinema devotees.

The lead is Francois Cluzet (The Intouchables) – the French Dustin Hoffman – and just as reliable. He plays Max, a once-successful man on the brink of his 60th birthday. Recently split from his long-term wife and in trouble financially, Max is really struggling but he is too proud to let his friends know. When they all show up unannounced, it’s a surprise for Max but not a pleasant one. His best friend Eric (Gilles Lellouche) had previously fallen out badly with Max. Now, eight years on, Eric is a rich and famous actor. Of course, we know that they will become bosom pals again. Also in the mix is Marion Cotillard (Canet’s real-life wife), showing her wild side as the punky single mum Marie who is trying to blot out the world with alcohol. Once again, her redemption is signposted from a very long way off.

The film comes across a little like a French version of Rachel Ward’s Palm Beach, where a bunch of very talented and successful middle-class friends get together and angst a bit in a ravishing location. Of course, the We’ll End Up Together characters’ bourgeois concerns are so quintessentially French, which sets up resentment or envy depending on how you feel when you got out of bed on the day you see it. After all, it’s hard not to long for a place (and time) where no one seems to wear seat belts, and everyone smokes freely everywhere, and the good wine flows like water.

The prolific Canet is highly esteemed, and everyone in the stellar cast said they wanted to be in this one just to work with him. Any film with Cluzet, Lellouche, Cotillard, etc, is passable, and even though one could have wished for a bit more grit and substance, this is also easy to watch.

 

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Comments

  1. Travis C

    “His best friend Ludo (Jean Dujardin billed in the credits as a sort of guest appearance but actually in more or less every scene) had previously fallen out badly with Max. Now, eight years on, Ludo is a rich and famous actor.”

    You’ve got your characters and actors mixed up there. Jean Dujardin’s Ludo is dead, and only seen in flashbacks. Gilles Lellouche plays the famous actor, named Eric.

    1. Author
      Dov Kornits

      thanks Travis, appreciate your comment and correction, we have amended the review accordingly.

  2. JOYCE ORVIS

    NOTHING COOL ABOUT SMOKING ! HOW COME YOU SEE SO MANY ACTORS LIGHTING UP ON SCREEN NO MATTER WHAT FILM YOU ARE WATCHING !?
    I AM A SERIOUS FILM-LOVER OF MANY YEARS & REMEMBER THE ANTI-SMOKING CAMPAIGNS FROM THE PAST & WHAT HAPPENED?!

  3. Lis

    Hi, the Ludo/Eric mistake has not been amended yet. Also, worth noting that this film is a sequel, and while it can be viewed on its own, it’s so much richer and funnier if you know the characters and their shared past and their feelings about Ludo if you’ve seen the first one, “Little White Lies”.

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