The Night Crew

December 21, 2015

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"...there’s enough exhilaration on hand to keep the story moving along despite its limited scenery."
The Night Crew

The Night Crew

John Noonan
Year: 2015
Rating: MA15+
Director: Christian Sesma
Cast:

Luke Goss, Danny Trejo, Bokeem Woodbine

Distributor: Pinnacle
Released: December 31, 2015
Running Time: TBC
Worth: $12.00

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

…there’s enough exhilaration on hand to keep the story moving along despite its limited scenery.

With his British boy band roots firmly behind him, Luke Goss has carved himself quite a career as an action hero and The Night Crew, co-starring Danny Trejo, is perhaps one of the finer examples of his work outside of Hellboy 2.

Goss plays Wade; the leader of  a gang of bounty hunters carting a fugitive across state whilst under the close and violent scrutiny of Trejo’s cartel leader, Aguilar, who will do anything to get them back. Said fugitive is Mae, played by Chasty Ballesteros, whose importance is kept somewhat under wraps for the majority of the narrative. When her past is eventually brought to light, it has the potential to be a jumping off point for a number of viewers. You’re either going to roll with it or you’re not. In Night Crew’s defence, the film does drop enough hints throughout to somewhat cushion the blow for those unrepentant in their dislike of twists.

Stepping away from that for fear of spoilers, what can be discussed is the film’s tenacity to give you some killer action scenes. As Aguilar closes in on our band of not-so-merry bounty hunters, they decide to seek refuge in an abandoned motel. From this point on, there’s enough exhilaration on hand to keep the story moving along despite its limited scenery.

Director Christian Sesma’s finer moments come not from people being blown through doors, but one-off little moments that come out with an iconic status. Such as when Mae stands emotionless and unmoving as bullets fly around her, literally moving one stray hair from her face after another. Admittedly adding nothing to the action, it does suggest a maturity in direction that goes beyond the gung-ho ‘let’s see if this blows up’ attitude presented on screen.

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