Inseparables (Cine Latino)

November 14, 2017

Festival, Review, This Week Leave a Comment

There’s no denying that Inseparable wears a large heart on its sleeve.
inseparable (002)

Inseparables (Cine Latino)

John Noonan
Year: 2016
Rating: NA
Director: Marcos Carnevale
Cast:

Oscar Martínez, Rodrigo de la Serna, Carla Peterson, Alejandra Flechner

Distributor: Cine Latino Film Festival
Released: November 14 – 29, 2017
Running Time: 108 minutes
Worth: $12.50

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

There’s no denying that Inseparable wears a large heart on its sleeve.

French film The Intouchables was a major hit both in its home country and abroad back in 2011. So much so, it probably comes as no surprise that it’s been booked in for an American remake, which should surface next year in the shape of The Upside. Meanwhile, over in Argentina, the film has already been reinterpreted as Inseparables and the result is a mixed bag.

Felipe (Oscar Martínez) is a wealthy quadriplegic who requires around the clock support. Tired of being babied by the people hired by his PA, Felipe decides to give duty of care to his fiery-tempered gardener, Tito (Rodrigo de la Serna). Tito lives a hand to mouth existence and his rough and ready approach to life is in sharp contrast to Felipe’s.

Even if you’ve never seen the original, or simply know about the true story upon which it’s based, you’ll already be fully aware of where this all going; with Felipe discovering, through Tito’s abrasive care, that there’s still so much more to enjoy in life.

There’s no denying that Inseparables wears a large heart on its sleeve. It’s a sweet natured film and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Both leads have a strong chemistry that ensures you’re more than happy to stay in their company for the remainder of the film. De la Serna is particularly strong as the boisterous but fragile Tito.

And yet, what truly lets the film down, is director Marcos Carnevale seemingly not wanting to deviate too much from the source material. We’re not talking Gus Van Sant’s Psycho in terms of mimicry, but if you’re not going to put your personal stamp on it, and with so much brought over wholesale from the original, it’s a wonder why you would remake it all.

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