That’s a Wrap for the Green Room Filmmaker Fund, Folks!

September 19, 2018

The third and final round of the Green Room Filmmaker Fund has been completed with over 200 applications from members of the Green Room international filmmaking community, ranging from short films, docos to features and music videos.
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That’s a Wrap for the Green Room Filmmaker Fund, Folks!

The third and final round of the Green Room Filmmaker Fund has been completed with over 200 applications from members of the Green Room international filmmaking community, ranging from short films, docos to features and music videos.

“Our members are all working on amazing projects. That’s the first privilege for any creative person: to have something they are passionate about and work towards its completion. Not everybody could share in the limited funds, but that’s something we all understand” say founders Kosta Nikas and Peter Lord.

“We are proud of our community at The Green Room and we expect many of our members to be making a name for themselves in the creative sphere in the near future” they added.

The winning recipients for funding support for this final round are:

THE VOICE ACTRESS

By Anna Takayama

(JAPAN | USA)

Synopsis

Kingyo (“Goldfish” in Japanese) is a veteran voice actress working and living alone in Tokyo. She possesses a unique ability to see the soul in everything, living and inanimate. Her days are consumed by meticulous rehearsals, character studies, anime voiceover sessions and taking care of her pet goldfish, perhaps her only real friend. The voiceover world is rapidly changing and a generation of attractive young voice actors are in vogue. Rising directors place their values on surface-level attributes. Kingyo finds herself at a crossroads with her career and must reconcile her otherworldly ability with the ever-changing, soulless modern world.

Filmmaker Statement

Anime has become one of Japan’s premiere cultural exports, but the world of voice actors behind the screen is rarely documented. As a first generation Japanese-American, I emigrated to New York, leaving behind my mother, a veteran voice actress based in Tokyo. In the decade since leaving, I’ve felt a strong desire to return and document her unique style of working. Her method cuts against the modern expectations of superficially-driven voice work, and instead, stems from principles of empathy and imagination. For her, as with Kingyo, all things have a soul, and her work seeks to give a voice to those that cannot speak. Now more than ever, this story of a strong independent woman needs telling, to give a voice to those unheard. Receiving support from the Green Room would make this dream possible, and enable me to share this deeply personal story with a wide international audience.

BURN
by George Tsirogiannis

(GREECE)

Synopsis

After their dying father announces he has written something very important on his penultimate pack of cigarettes, three middle-aged siblings go on a treasure hunt that leads to a family crisis. Inspired by a short story by acclaimed Greek author Achilleas Kyriakides.

Filmmaker Statement

I once read the phrase by screenwriter Steve Kaplan, “comedy helps us live with who we are”. Using this and the source story as creative fuel, I wrote this comedy that neither excuses nor condemns the constant absence of a selfish father and the greed of his “suffering” children – who still walk the line between their traumas of the past and hope for the future, even though they have been adults for long. After all, mistakes and imperfections define us, either we like it or not. At its core and below its comedic skin, “Burn” is the coming-of-age story of three people who should have come of age much, much earlier in their lives.

The Green Room Fund will drive the project forward, securing a part of its budget in a time when short film productions in Greece are becoming harder due to its public funding organizations underfunctioning.

WHITE MAN’S CURSE

By Peter Duncanson

(USA)

Synopsis

A conversation between slaves reveals that the real chains of slavery are not physical. They are chains that enslave the mind and spirit. We travel through the modern streets of Brooklyn observing how african americans use the word and as the camera turns we time travel to 1844 and observe a conversation between slaves. One slave instructs another slave on how to be a good slave.

 

Filmmaker Statement

I wrote White Man’s Curse to give post millennials and people in general who are stuck in the “Matrix” of modern tech society a clear history about where words come from and how we use them. Specifically, the N word. It is a day and age where most children and specifically children of color have never really learned the history of the word.  Yes perhaps they here a bit about it in school but never get a chance to really understand the underlying spirit of slavery that embodies the word. It is so prevalent in modern society, in the music and in the street slang but It is rare

that anyone actually thinks about what they really mean when they say it.

The question I attempt to ask with White Man’s Curse is, “does the vibrational energy of a word’s history travel with it though time?”