Help make a documentary about the firebombing of Tokyo

March 19, 2020

Australian produced Paper City —about the survivors of the firebombing of Tokyo, which shines a light on the lasting impact of civilian-targeted air raids.
Kiyooka zoomed standing on Kototoi Bridge

Help make a documentary about the firebombing of Tokyo

Australian produced Paper City —about the survivors of the firebombing of Tokyo, which shines a light on the lasting impact of civilian-targeted air raids.

75 years after the end of the war, Australian documentary filmmakers Adrian Francis and Melanie Brunt tell the untold story of the firebombing of Tokyo.

A FORGOTTEN TRAGEDY

Just after midnight on March 10, 1945, the U.S. carried out a massive incendiary air attack on eastern Tokyo, unleashing a firestorm that devastated this densely urban area of wooden and paper houses. By sunrise, more than 100,000 people had been killed, a million people made homeless, and a quarter of the city wiped off the map. Devastation.​ ​

But while the memory of this tragedy is forever seared in the minds of the survivors, for many people in Japan and abroad, the firebombing is ancient historyーforgotten. Paper City is the story of three survivors desperate to leave behind a record of this forgotten tragedyーbefore the last of them passes away.

Producer Melanie Brunt says “We think this is a story that will resonate with audiences all over the world—and hope to screen at international film festivals, on TV, SVOD and online platforms, as well as holding screenings and discussions at schools, museums and universities. In doing so, we will carry the survivors’ stories far beyond their current sphere of influence.”​ ​

“Many of the psychological wounds that were opened in WW2 continue to fester—causing pain to individuals and families, and mistrust between nations” says Director Adrian Francis. “Our hope is that Paper City will encourage dialogue about the past, between younger and older generations, and between people from different nations. Above all, we want to promote peace, empathy and understanding. The psychological scars of war linger long after the physical ones have healed—something we should remember when civilians continue to be targeted in contemporary conflicts.”​ ​

Screen Australia has announced their support of the project, but they still need to raise the rest of the budget. To check out the trailer & crowdfunding campaign, click here.

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