DEADLY DINOSAURS WITH STEVE BACKSHALL TO PREMIERE IN AUSTRALIAN CINEMAS THESE SCHOOL HOLIDAYS AND IT’S GOING TO BE ‘ROAR-SOME’!

August 30, 2018

In Cinemas from 20th September
deadly

DEADLY DINOSAURS WITH STEVE BACKSHALL TO PREMIERE IN AUSTRALIAN CINEMAS THESE SCHOOL HOLIDAYS AND IT’S GOING TO BE ‘ROAR-SOME’!

In Cinemas from 20th September

not only have a new series to get excited about but for the first time ever, they will be able to watch it on the big screen with daredevil stunts and killer special effects bringing the world’s most deadly dinosaurs roaring back to life.

In Deadly Dinosaurs, Steve is on the hunt for the most deadly animals to have walked the earth: dinosaurs. Razor-sharp claws, giant whipping tails and the infamous T-Rex are hunted-down in the quest to find the world’s deadliest dinosaur.

In his explorer’s Dino Den, Steve brings dinosaurs back to life with cutting-edge CGI. Outside of the lab, the spectacle is cranked up to the max in a series of epic stunts, which reveal the raw power and scale of Steve’s favourite and most deadly dinosaurs. A combination of breath-taking spectacle and physical daring is served up in this immersive, action-packed cinema event. Think you know dinosaurs? Think again!

Said Steve Backshall, “Australia is home to some of the deadliest animals in the world and I’m delighted that my fans down under will be able to experience the raw power and scale of these predators on the big screen.”

Deadly Dinosaurs is 90 minutes in duration and will be shown at select Event and Village locations around Australia. More information on venues and ticket sales here: https://www.bbcaustralia.com/events/deadly-dinosaurs

About Steve Backshall
Naturalist Steve Backshall is best known for BBC Earth children’s TV show Deadly 60, in which he tracks down the world’s most dangerous animals. He is an author, expedition leader, naturalist, wildlife expert and a fearless presenter. Having travelled the world to learn about the most inspiring predators, Steve has swum with sharks, been bitten by a caiman, squirted with ink by Humboldt squid, flirted with a tarantula, charged by elephants, and stared out by thresher and great hammerhead sharks, but still maintains that wild animals pose no threat to people – in fact quite the opposite.