Anton Corbijn Inside Out

  • Year:2012
  • Rating:M
  • Director:Klaartje Quirijns
  • Cast: Bono, Anton Corbijn, Martin Gore, James Hetfield
  • Release Date:November 01, 2012
  • Distributor:Regency
  • Running time:85 minutes
  • Film Worth:$17.00
  • FILMINK rates movies out of $20 - the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

A reflective and revealing doco which offers up surprising revelations about its fascinating subject.

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As relayed in Klaartje Quirijns’ documentary, when Bono saw his first photo from Anton Corbijn, he said that he one day sought to become who he saw in the picture. The U2 frontman’s statement is testament to the rare and raw talent of the Dutch rock photographer and music video director whose thirty-year career has seen him brilliantly transform the visuals of pop music, before turning his hand to filmmaking with 2007’s stellar Ian Curtis biopic, Control. And now Corbijn finds himself on the other side of the camera in this four-years-in-the-making doco, which paints a piercing and poignant portrait of a visionary talent, and the complex forces that drive him.

Rather than taking her cues from the featured rock ‘n’ roll legends, Quirijns opts for a more reflective and personal approach, as we follow Corbijn travelling the globe to photograph the likes of Arcade Fire, U2, Depeche Mode and Lou Reed. There’s also footage of Corbijn scouting locations for his second feature, the George Clooney-starring crime drama, The American, while questioning whether he’s up to the task.

It’s a thrill to see Corbijn at work with these icons, but the best parts of the doco are the revealing interviews with the gently spoken man himself. Corbijn relays how music got its claws into him growing up, and also provides fascinating insight into his artistic process. But the richest theme that the film hits upon is how formative Corbijn’s strict religious upbringing under his distant preacher father proved to be to his work, which is often characterised by a sense of sadness and isolation. Just like the man himself, this doco scratches at the soul of its subject, and what it offers up – particularly in its final moments – is surprising and heartbreaking.

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